Gulp, Gulp, Go

Your kids will love making this toy car out of plastic bottles like many sponsored children do.

Families living in poverty often scavenge for reusable items like plastic bottles. Sometimes they sell them, and sometimes kids use them to make toys.

Cars made of plastic bottles are especially popular among children in developing countries. As you make this craft with your kids, you can teach them about being content with what they have.

SUPPLIES

  • clean plastic bottle
  • paint or colorful paper
  • drinking straw
  • duct tape
  • lids from 4 plastic bottles
  • hammer
  • nail
  • 2 wooden skewers
  • glue or tape
  • long string

DIRECTIONS

  1. Decorate the bottle with paint or colorful paper.
  2. Cut the straw in half. Attach each half to one side of the bottle using duct tape.
  3. Make holes in 4 bottle lids with the hammer and nail. These are your wheels.
  4. Push a wooden skewer through each straw. Then push the ends of the skewers through the wheel holes. Trim the skewers and tape or glue them to the wheels for added support.
  5. Tie the string around the neck of the bottle so your child can pull around the car.

Put Your Family’s Faith In Action

Find more resources for your family, including travel opportunities, concerts in your city and devotionals!  

Visit the Website


What toys have your kids made out of plastic bottles? Share them with us!

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